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Catching up with Kosmopolis15

Sebald's EyeglassesW.G. Sebald’s Eyeglasses, from his archive at Deutsches Literaturarchivs Marbach

Kosmopolis15 continues to post new material to their Sebaldiana website. Articles recently added include:

“The Clocks of Austerlitz” by Graciela Speranza. “Two clocks mark our first encounter with Jacques Austerlitz, the protagonist of W.G. Sebald’s final novel which was launched into the new millennium in 2001 like a sombre coda to the history of the 21st century and a profession of faith in the art of the 21st century. A narrator, who is hard to distinguish from Sebald himself, approaches Austerlitz in Antwerp Centraal Station, intrigued by one of the few travellers who isn’t staring apathetically into space in the Salle des pas perdus, but paying close attention to the station’s monumental architecture while making sketches, notes and taking photographs.

“Conversation between Bruno Galinda and Iain Sinclair.” “Born in Wales in 1943, a year before Sebald, Iain Sinclair has written a series of books exploring the themes and territories that are now considered the cornerstones of Sebald’s project. Years before the author of Austerlitz reached the height of his popularity, Sinclair had already brought an encyclopaedic breadth to some of his finest books,  together with a concern to recover forgotten history and the aesthetic of the flâneur in the city. In the short conversation we are presenting here, the writer and journalist Bruno Galindo takes Sinclair’s work as a starting point in order to follow the traces of  W.G. Sebald in one of the most interesting examples of English prose of the past few decades.”

“On Sebald’s Radicalism” by Uwe Schütte. “At the very core of Sebald’s melancholic Weltanschauung [worldview] is the fundamentally bleak insight that destruction – and not creation – is the organising principle of nature. Like Gnostics, he viewed the world as a process of decay, and he saw humanity as a helpless subject of the destructive machinations that govern human history. Wars, atrocities, and genocides of all kind are not exceptions but symptoms and indicators of an all-embracing Natural History of Destruction that crushes human aspirations in the name of a secure future, to create a better society or to build a world without war and misery.”

 

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