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Ali Smith: “Oh dear God – was that Sebald?”

In an interview in the current issue of The Paris Review, Ali Smith recounts going to a 1998 interview for a fellowship at the University of East Anglia.

I got met at the office by a man named Max—a very nice German man who took me along the corridor to the interview and who sat in as an onlooker. That night, I got home, I went to bed—and I woke up in the middle of the night, going, Oh dear God —was that Sebald?

It was. Smith got the fellowship and got to know Sebald a bit.

What I know, even from that tangent, is that he was an incredibly charismatic figure, he was like no one I’ve ever met. Plus, not many people know that he was funny, funny, funny. He was laugh-out loud droll. We haven’t yet begun to understand his rigor, as a writer.

On reading Sebald:

Austerlitz [is] the most uneasy novel I’ve ever read, a novel uneasy with the notion of being a novel. I read all of Sebald’s books again after his death, and it was very different from reading them when he was alive.He is utterly despairing, particularly in The Rings of Saturn. It’s terrible, beautiful, and there’s no hope. And then you get to Austerlitz, and in Austerlitz despair is ultimately a fiction, too.

I’m a big fan of the The Paris Review interviews, but the interviews with Ali Smith and Percival Everett in this summer’s issue (#221) are terrific. They are two smart writers. Kudos to the interviewers – Justin Taylor and Adam Begley.

2 Comments Post a comment
  1. Terry, have you seen the book by Leonid Andreyev, “Visions”? Though not textually embedded, the collection of stories contains multiple quite haunting and beautiful self-portraits of the author. They appear as if they could be a lost figure from a Sebald work. May interest you. Cheers!

    July 1, 2017
    • Thanks! I will check this out. – Terry

      July 1, 2017

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